Question: Why Did The Framers Ultimately Choose To Elect A President Through The Electoral College?

When did electoral college start?

In 1804, 12th Amendment to the Constitution made sure that electors designate their votes for president and vice president, but the 12th Amendment leaves in place a tie breaking system established by the Constitution by which the House of Representatives breaks a tie on presidential electoral votes and the Senate ….

Why did the framers establish the Electoral College?

The Electoral College was created by the framers of the U.S. Constitution as an alternative to electing the president by popular vote or by Congress. … Several weeks after the general election, electors from each state meet in their state capitals and cast their official vote for president and vice president.

What branch of government is the Electoral College in?

The President enforces the laws that the Legislative Branch (Congress) makes. The President is elected by United States citizens, 18 years of age and older, who vote in the presidential elections in their states. These votes are tallied by states and form the Electoral College system.

Is South Carolina winner take all?

Under South Carolina law, the State appoints all nine presidential electors based on the presidential candidate who receives the most votes in a statewide election. This “winner-take-all” approach dates back to the first presidential election and is currently used by forty-eight states and the District of Columbia.

What major change did the 12th Amendment make in the electoral college system?

Passed by Congress December 9, 1803, and ratified June 15, 1804, the 12th Amendment provided for separate Electoral College votes for President and Vice President, correcting weaknesses in the earlier electoral system which were responsible for the controversial Presidential Election of 1800.

Who picks the Electoral College?

Instead, the election of the president of the United States is a two-step process. First, voters cast ballots on Election Day in each state. In nearly every state, the candidate who gets the most votes wins the “electoral votes” for that state, and gets that number of voters (or “electors”) in the “Electoral College.”

What are the three qualifications for becoming president?

As directed by the Constitution, a presidential candidate must be a natural born citizen of the United States, a resident for 14 years, and 35 years of age or older. These requirements do not prohibit women or minority candidates from running.

What is the Iowa caucus and why is it important?

The caucuses are also held to select delegates to county conventions and party committees, among other party activities. The Iowa caucuses used to be noteworthy as the first major contest of the United States presidential primary season.

How do electoral votes work?

The number of electors each state gets is equal to its total number of Senators and Representatives in Congress. A total of 538 electors form the Electoral College. Each elector casts one vote following the general election. The candidate who gets 270 votes or more wins.

What role does the electoral college play in the election of a president?

The Electoral College is a method of indirect popular election of the President of the United States. Instead of voting for a specific candidate, voters in an indirect popular election select a panel of individuals pledged to vote for a specific candidate.

What happens if the President elect dies before the Electoral College meets?

If the apparent winner of the general election dies before the Electoral College votes in December the electors would likely be expected to endorse whatever new nominee their national party selects as a replacement. … The Constitution did not originally include the term president-elect.

What are two criticisms of the electoral college?

Three criticisms of the College are made:It is “undemocratic;”It permits the election of a candidate who does not win the most votes; and.Its winner-takes-all approach cancels the votes of the losing candidates in each state.

What happens if the Electoral College is tied?

In such a situation, the House chooses one of the top three presidential electoral vote-winners as the president, while the Senate chooses one of the top two vice presidential electoral vote-winners as vice president. The contingent election process was modified by the 20th Amendment, which took effect in 1933.

Which two states split up the electors between candidates?

Under the District Method, a State’s electoral votes can be split among two or more candidates, just as a state’s congressional delegation can be split among multiple political parties. As of 2008, Nebraska and Maine are the only states using the District Method of distributing electoral votes.

What is the purpose of the Electoral College?

The Electoral College is a body of electors established by the United States Constitution, which forms every four years for the sole purpose of electing the president and vice president of the United States.

Is the Electoral College in the Constitution?

Established in Article II, Section 1 of the U.S. Constitution, the Electoral College is the formal body which elects the President and Vice President of the United States.

What is the 25th Amendment in simple terms?

The Twenty-fifth Amendment (Amendment XXV) to the United States Constitution says that if the President becomes unable to do his job, the Vice President becomes the President. This can happen for just a little while, if the President is just sick or disabled for a short time.

Why were most framers opposed to choosing the president by popular vote?

Why were most of the framers opposed to choosing a president by popular vote? … They believed that voters in such a large country couldn’t learn enough about the candidates to make an informed decision. They believed that if it was chosen by Congress it would be, “too much under the legislative thumb.”