Quick Answer: How Do You Explain The Electoral College?

When citizens cast their ballots for president in the popular vote, they elect a slate of electors.

Electors then cast the votes that decide who becomes president of the United States.

Usually, electoral votes align with the popular vote in an election..

Who becomes president if no election?

If no presidential candidate reaches the 270-vote threshold, the election for the president would be decided by the House of Representatives in a run-off contingent election. Similarly, if no vice-presidential candidate reaches that threshold, the election for the vice president would be decided by the Senate.

Who picks the Electoral College?

Instead, the election of the president of the United States is a two-step process. First, voters cast ballots on Election Day in each state. In nearly every state, the candidate who gets the most votes wins the “electoral votes” for that state, and gets that number of voters (or “electors”) in the “Electoral College.”

Why is the Iowa caucus a big deal?

Unlike primary elections in most other U.S. states, where registered voters go to polling places to cast ballots, Iowans instead gather at local caucus meetings to discuss and vote on the candidates. … The Iowa caucuses used to be noteworthy as the first major contest of the United States presidential primary season.

Are Republicans caucusing in Iowa?

The Iowa caucuses are a closed caucus, with Iowa awarding 40 pledged delegates to the Republican National Convention, allocated on the basis of the results of the caucuses.

When did caucuses begin in our history?

The system was introduced after George Washington had announced his retirement upon the end of his second term, when the Democratic-Republican Party, and Federalist Party began contesting elections on a partisan basis. Both parties may have held informal caucuses in 1796 to try to decide on their candidates.

What do the delegates do?

A delegate is a person selected to represent a group of people in some political assembly of the United States. … In the United States Congress delegates are elected to represent the interests of a United States territory and its citizens or nationals.

Who becomes president after an impeachment?

If the President dies, resigns, or is removed from office, the Vice President becomes President for the rest of the term. If the Vice President is unable to serve, the Speaker of the House acts as President.

Has there ever been an Electoral College tie?

The original system for electing presidents provided that the candidate receiving a majority of Electoral College votes would become president, while the runner-up would become vice president. The 1800 election resulted in a tie between Thomas Jefferson and Aaron Burr.

What is the point of the Electoral College?

The Electoral College is a body of electors established by the United States Constitution, which forms every four years for the sole purpose of electing the president and vice president of the United States.

Why did they create the Electoral College?

As prescribed in the U.S. Constitution, American presidents are elected not directly by the people, but by the people’s electors. The Electoral College was created by the framers of the U.S. Constitution as an alternative to electing the president by popular vote or by Congress.

When did the electoral college start?

About this object The 1953 electoral vote count declared Dwight D. Eisenhower the winner. The 12th Amendment—ratified in 1804—changed the original process, allowing for separate ballots for determining the President and Vice President. See Electoral College and Indecisive Elections for more information.

Can Obama be vice president?

Joe Biden2009–2017Barack Obama/Vice presidents